Tag Archives: Odocoileus hemionus

Are You My Mother?

Throughout the summer a mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) doe and her fawn visited our yard (near Lookout CA, Modoc County) almost every day. (see “Mule Deer Fawn” on 08-13-2013) They made the rounds eating our pear and plum trees, grape … Continue reading

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Mule Deer Fawn

This week I noticed a mule deer fawn (Odocoileus hemionus) outside my study window. On the other side of the fence was the fawn’s mother. The fawn was agitated because it could not jump over the fence, even though the … Continue reading

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Reading the Snow

This gallery contains 4 photos.

Snow and frigid temperatures have inundated Big Valley CA, our home, recently. Leonard and I enjoy “reading the snow” to determine which animals wander through our pastures and the wildlife area on our property. We found the tracks of four … Continue reading

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Swimming Mule Deer

This gallery contains 3 photos.

Deer are accomplished swimmers. With their powerful hind legs and stamina, deer can swim at speeds up to 15 miles per hour. Additionally, the coat of a deer helps these mammals swim distances up to 10 miles. The deer undercoat … Continue reading

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The Deer Who Came To Dinner

In Kaufman and Hart’s 1939 comedy “The Man Who Came to Dinner”, Sheridan Whiteside came to dinner at the Stanley household in Ohio and through circumstances did not leave. The mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) ranging through our yard in search … Continue reading

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Antlers in Velvet

Antlers are bony extensions of the skull that grow from attachment points called pedicles. The antler grows from the tip in late winter and spring. The antler starts out as cartilage which is replaced by bone. While the antler is … Continue reading

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Stotting

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Perhaps reindeer can fly, but mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) stot. “Stot” means “to bounce” or “a bouncing gait”.  Mule deer run by stotting – pushing off from the ground with all four feet at once and landing on all four … Continue reading

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