Tag Archives: Grus canadensis

Unusual Behavior

Already this year I did several sandhill crane (Antigone canadensis) posts. Although I do not like to repeat a species too often, a sandhill crane recently exhibited unusual behavior that has us wondering. Leonard and I were hiking in Ash … Continue reading

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Earliest Ever

It was cold and drizzly this morning when Leonard and I went on our daily hike. We could hear coyotes singing on the nearby butte and several formations of swans flew overhead. Before long the sun peeked out revealing a … Continue reading

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Finally!

With the arrival of February Leonard and I begin to listen and watch for the sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). Usually we hear the far-carrying, loud, guttural bugling of the cranes before we see them. So far this year February has … Continue reading

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Sandhill Cranes Arrive

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Each February Leonard and I anxiously await the return of the sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis). Their arrival signals that despite cold temperatures, howling North winds and even snow, spring IS not too far away. We love to listen to their … Continue reading

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Migrating Sandhill Cranes

This gallery contains 2 photos.

Except for three subspecies resident to Mississippi, Florida and Cuba, sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) migrate between southern United States and northern Mexico in the winter and northern North America in the summer. Sandhill cranes usually live in pairs or small … Continue reading

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Sandhill Cranes Arrive

Each spring Leonard and I anxiously await the return of sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) to Big Valley, our home. Snow may remain on the ground, yet the loud calls of sandhill cranes remind us that spring is at last on … Continue reading

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Sandhill Crane Nest

Sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) mate for life. They prefer nesting sites in isolated wetlands, preferably with standing vegetation. One to three pale yellow to olive eggs with irregular brownish markings are laid in the nest formed from dried vegetation and … Continue reading

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